Posts Tagged ‘low-carb’

Irish Stew Over Mashed Turnips

Traditional Irish Stew is made with white potatoes and mutton or lamb. This version uses turnips and beef and is sure to be a winner at your next St. Patrick’s Day party!

Irish Stew Over Mashed Turnips

St. Patrick’s Day is one of my favorite holidays, especially in Chicago! For me, it marks the moment when I know we’ve made it through winter. Even though we still have quite a few cold days on the horizon (and sometimes even a bit more snow!), spring is just around the corner and warmer days are ahead of us. 

st. patricks day chicago

Dyeing the river green for St. Patrick’s Day in Chicago!

Since white potatoes are a no-no on the Paleo diet, I toyed with the idea of making mashed sweet potatoes to go with this stew. I opted for turnips because I wanted the “look” of mashed potatoes, but if you think mashed turnips and turnips in the stew will be turnip overload, you could sub parsnips for turnips in the stew.

Traditional Irish stew uses mutton or lamb. I’m not a huge fan of lamb so I used stew meat. My grocery store sells stew meat cubed and packaged. If your grocer does not have stew meat, you can use pot roast or chuck roast and cube the beef yourself. 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 

Irish Stew Over Mashed Turnips
Traditional Irish Stew is made with white potatoes and mutton or lamb. This version uses turnips and beef and is sure to be a winner at your next St. Patrick’s Day party!
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Stew Ingredients
  1. 2 lbs. stew beef
  2. 2 turnips, cubed
  3. 4 carrots, peeled and chopped
  4. 1 onion, diced
  5. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  6. 1 bag frozen peas
  7. 6 - 8 cups beef broth (use 6 cups for a thicker stew, use 8 cups for a thinner soup-like consistency)
  8. 1 tablespoon ghee (or fat of choice for browning the beef)
Mashed Turnip Ingredients
  1. 2 large turnips, cubed
  2. 1 tablespoon ghee
  3. onion powder
  4. garlic powder
  5. salt and pepper
Directions for the stew
  1. Season your beef with salt and pepper. In a heavy bottom pot over medium-high heat, melt ghee and brown the meat. Note: You'll have to do this in batches. Do not overcrowd your pot or you will end up steaming the beef instead of browning it.
  2. Once the beef is browned, remove it from the pot and place it on a separate plate or bowl.
  3. Add the onions to the pot, stir and cook until they are translucent (about 5 minutes). If your meat was lean, you may have to add a little more ghee for this step.
  4. Add the garlic and cook for about 2 minutes.
  5. Add the beef broth and stir, scraping any brown bits off the bottom of the pan.
  6. Add meat and any juices that have accumulated on the plate back to the pot and bring to a boil.
  7. Add the carrots, turnips, and peas. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes.
Directions for the mashed turnips
  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
  2. Add turnips and cook until they soften. This should take about 15 minutes, but will depend on the size of your turnip cubes.
  3. Drain and return the turnips to the hot pot.
  4. Add ghee and mash the turnips using a potato masher.
  5. Season to your liking with garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and pepper.
Cucina Kristina http://cucinakristina.com/

Summertime Mango Salsa

This recipe for mango salsa has me dreaming of summer! It’s great on it’s own or as a topping for fish!

Mango and Avocado Salsa is a great topping for fish | Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

We are experiencing the 4th snowiest and 3rd coldest winter in Chicago ever. Ever! It’s likely that this is the worst we’ll see for a long time, but if next winter rolls around and tries to compete for any slot in the top 10 “worst winters,” I’m moving. My husband can come with me if he wants to, but if he opts to stay here, I’ll book a visiting flight for June. I simply cannot take anymore winters like this one! When I woke up this morning and looked out the window to see that it was snowing, this was my EXACT reaction.

Over the weekend, I found myself dreaming of summer. Usually, by this time in March, I am looking forward to spring, but this year I am skipping over spring and looking straight to summer. Nothing reminds me more of warm summer days than fruit salsa. Fruit salsa pairs nicely with a margarita and margaritas pair nicely with sitting on a beach in the sun, amiright? 

Mango and Avocado Salsa is a great topping for fish | Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

To make this salsa, I combined avocado and mango with traditional salsa ingredients. I added jicama and red pepper to give this salsa a chunkier texture since avocados and mangos are both soft. If you can’t find jicama at your local grocery store, you could add radish, apples, or cucumber for texture.

You can serve this salsa as an appetizer or use it as a topping for fish, pork, or chicken. You could also serve it alongside steak and veggies as a salad or, you can do what I do, and eat it right out of the bowl with a spoon!

Mango & Avocado Salsa
This recipe for mango and avocado salsa has me dreaming of summer! It’s great on it’s own or as a topping for fish!
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Ingredients
  1. 1 ripe mango, diced
  2. 1 avocado, diced
  3. 1 jicama, diced
  4. 1 red pepper, diced
  5. 1 small shallot, diced
  6. 1 clove garlic, minced
  7. 1 jalapeño, finely chopped
  8. 1 handful of cilantro, minced
  9. 1-2 limes
  10. salt & pepper
Instructions
  1. Using a vegetable peeler, peel the jicama then dice into small cubes.
  2. Dice mango, avocado, and red pepper.
  3. Dice the jalapeño. If you want your salsa to have some heat, leave the seeds in. Otherwise, remove the seeds and the rib before chopping.
  4. Finely chop the shallot and cilantro and mince the garlic.
  5. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and use a fork to mix then together.
  6. Squeeze the juice of 1-2 limes into the bowl. Stir to combine and season with sale and pepper to taste.
Notes
  1. For tips on how to cut a mango, go here.
  2. For tips on how to cut a pepper, go here.
Cucina Kristina http://cucinakristina.com/
 

8 Great Egg-free, Meat-free Paleo Breakfasts

I’m delighted to share a guest post I wrote for my blogger (and real life) friend, Jenny B, over at Honey & Birch. Every week she rounds-up 8 recipes or crafts that she finds around the web. I was really excited when she asked me to write a post for her and even more excited when we came up with the topic, egg-free Paleo breakfasts.

I happen to love eggs, but the two most common things people say when I tell them I’m Paleo are:

  1. I could never be Paleo, I don’t eat a lot of meat and
  2. You can’t eat cereal or bread?! What do you eat for breakfast? I don’t like eggs!

Well, I rounded up some of my favorite egg-free Paleo breakfast options and, by happy accident, they also happened to be meat-free! 
egg-free and meat-free Paleo breakfasts Head over to Honey & Birch to read my guest post and find the links to all of these tasty breakfast options.

If you are looking for more Paleo breakfast ideas follow my Paleo/Primal Breakfast board on Pinterest. I have a good mix of breakfast options there, many of which are not egg-centric. Some recipes, like these shredded pork breakfast tacos from PaleOMG use eggs as a binder, but I assure you there are many Paleo breakfast options beyond the omelette!

Follow Kristina Navarro | Cucina Kristina’s board Paleo/Primal Breakfast on Pinterest.

Don’t forget to check out Jenny B’s full 8 Great archive. I guarantee she’s probably got something you’ve been looking for!

Food Blogger Cookbook Swap!

Food Blogger Cookbook Swap

At the beginning of the month, I signed up for a Food Blogger Cookbook Swap, hosted by Alyssa of http://www.EverydayMaven.com and Faith of http://www.anediblemosaic.com. For the swap, I sent a gently used cookbook from my collection to a food blogger and received a cookbook from their collection in return. 

Which Cookbook Did I Get?

Vegetables: The Most Authoritative Guide to Buying, Preparing, and Cooking, with More Than 300 Recipes by James Peterson.

Food Blogger Cookbook Swap

Vegetables by James Peterson

A big shout out to Camilla from Culinary Adventures with Camilla for sending it to me. Camilla is a writer for Edible Monterey Bay magazine (that’s pretty much my dream job so I am super jealous!) and has quite the collection of recipes on her blog. Go check her out! You will not be disappointed.

I’m super pumped about this cookbook for two reasons. 1. It fits nicely into my Paleo and gluten-free way of life and 2. It has a TON of information about vegetables I have yet to try. For example:

Fiddlehead Ferns

Fiddlehead Ferns

Photo Source: Specialty Produce

Jerusalem Artichoke

Jerusalem Artichoke

Photo Source: With Love, Mags 

and, Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Photo Source: Healing Healthy

It also has a ton of information about how to buy each vegetable, the best way to cook it, how to store it, and how to prep it for cooking. This cookbook is seriously AMAZING! 

How to Prepare Asparagus

One of the cool things I learned from this book was how to properly prepare asparagus. The book states, that “asparagus must be peeled [because it] helps the asparagus cook evenly and makes almost the entire stalk as tender and as delightful to eat as the tip (James Peterson, p. 15).” And to think, I thought restaurants were peeling asparagus for the sole purpose of making it look pretty on the plate. 

I tried this technique the other night and, I have to admit, I was impressed with the results! To peel asparagus, simply lay it flat on your cutting board and peel the stalks using a vegetable peeler.

How to peel asparagus | peeled asparagus

Once peeled, I tossed the stalks in a bit of extra virgin olive oil, seasoned them with Lakeshore Drive seasoning (my current favorite!), and roasted them in a 400˚ oven for 15 minutes. I served them alongside some mahi mahi I had marinating in Three Citrus Garlic Marinade. It was a quick (read: lazy) meal, but it was delicious.

Check out the links below for all of the participating food bloggers. Visit their pages and see which books they received and how they intend to use them!

Participating Food Bloggers in the Swap

A Baker’s House
An Edible Mosaic
avocado bravado
Blue Kale Road
Blueberries And Blessings
Cheap Recipe Blog
Confessions of a Culinary Diva
Create Amazing Meals
Culinary Adventures with Camilla
Cupcake Project
Dinner is Served 1972
Done With Corn
Eats Well With Others
Everyday Maven
Flour Me With Love 
From My Sweet Heart 
girlichef 
Great Food 360° 
Healthy. Delicious. 
I’m Gonna Cook That! 
Je Mange la Ville 
Karen’s Kitchen Stories 
Kitchen Treaty 
Olive and Herb 
OnTheMove-In The Galley 
Our Best Bites 
Paleo Gone Sassy 
poet in the pantry 
Rhubarb and Honey 
Rocky Mountain Cooking
Shikha la mode 
Shockingly Delicious 
Sifting Focus 
Spiceroots 
Spoonful of Flavor 
Tara’s Multicultural Table 
The Not So Exciting Adventures of a Dabbler 
The Suburban Soapbox 
The Whole Family’s Food 

Turkey and Vegetable Chili

Turkey and Vegetable Chili | Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

Soooo…. according to Fox Sports, the Superbowl could be played at any point between Friday, January 31 and Sunday, February 3. Really? I thought this was a hoax when I first read about it as I was not aware that you could move the Super Bowl, but apparently this is really a thing. Craziness! Winter can be done now, amiright? I mean, they are talking about MOVING THE FREAKING SUPER BOWL because it is too cold and snowy! Ugh. My brain cannot process that.

BUT! Do you know what my brain can process? Tasty chili. :-) Chili is one of those dishes that lends itself perfectly for preparing on a Sunday and eating throughout the week. It also freezes really well so you can always make a huge batch, portion it out, and have it on hand for a quick mid-week meal. It’s no secret around here that I am a fan of preparing my meals for the week on Sunday afternoon. I get a lot of questions about what I prep and how I do it and I am in the process of writing up a Sunday Food Prep Tips and Tricks post so stay tuned for that. I am aiming to have that posted early next week so you can get a healthy start to the week after stuffing yourself silly with wings and chili at a Super Bowl party. 

I usually make chili with ground beef, but all I had on hand was ground turkey so I decided to give that a try. Much to my delight, it turned out great! In fact, I noticed that ground turkey forms larger chunks when cooked than ground beef which lead to a chunkier chili. Since I did not use beans in this recipe, I appreciated the heartiness of the turkey and will probably continue to use it from here on out. Don’t you love happy accidents? 

Turkey and Vegetable Chili
Serves 6
This chili recipe is highly adaptable! You can use any ground protein you'd like and can add more vegetables than the suggested amounts for a super chunky chili.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 30 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 30 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 tablespoons chili powder
  2. 2 tablespoons cumin
  3. 1 tablespoon oregano
  4. 1 teaspoon paprika
  5. 1 teaspoon onion powder
  6. 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  7. 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  8. 1 can fire roasted tomatoes
  9. 2 cans of water (I measure using the tomato can)
  10. 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  11. 1/4 ounce baker's chocolate (optional)
  12. 2 pounds ground turkey
  13. 1 red pepper, chopped
  14. 1 yellow pepper, chopped
  15. 1 orange pepper, chopped
  16. 4 carrots, chopped
  17. 1 clove of garlic, minced
  18. 1 large white onion, chopped (reserve about 1/3 for topping!)
  19. 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. In a heavy bottomed pot over medium heat, cook the onion and garlic in olive oil until the onion is soft.
  2. Add the ground turkey and stir frequently to cook the turkey all the way through.
  3. Add the tomato paste, tomatoes, water, spices and chocolate and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer over low heat for 40 minutes to let the flavors combine.
  4. Add the chopped carrots and chopped peppers and simmer for an additional 20 minutes or until the carrots have softened.
Cucina Kristina http://cucinakristina.com/

Paleo Beef Pho

Paleo Beef Pho | Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

When I made the switch to a Paleo diet, one of the things I missed the most was pho. Pho is a Vietnamese soup made with meat, vegetables, and rice noodles. Did you see the Man vs. Food Nation Super Pho Challenge episode? I am fairly certain I could crush that challenge with zero obstacles. 

As I was typing this recipe up, it dawned on me that you could make the broth beforehand, freeze it, and make this soup during the week in smaller quantities and in about 20 minutes. I don’t know why I didn’t think of that sooner! The next time I make this, I will have to remember that.

This is a copycat recipe that was inspired by the beef noodle soup from Penny’s Noodles in Chicago. When I was in graduate school, I used to pick this soup up on my way home from class and it was always so hard not to tear into the bag and eat it immediately! I like to eat this soup alongside a crisp, cold, cucumber salad. 

You’ll notice this recipe calls for star anise. Personally, I think that is a key flavor in this dish and should not be omitted. Star anise has a licorice flavor and adds a good layer of flavor to the broth. You can buy star anise online here if you cannot find it in your local grocery store.

My grocery store sells packaged chop suey meat. If your grocery does not sell chop suey beef, you can use stew beef. You’ll need to cut the stew beef into very small pieces before you cook it.

Paleo Beef Pho
Serves 4
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
2 hr 30 min
Total Time
3 hr
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
2 hr 30 min
Total Time
3 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 star anise
  2. 6 whole cloves
  3. 1 whole cinnamon stick
  4. 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  5. 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, minced
  6. 1 shallot, minced
  7. 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
  8. 1 lb. chop suey meat
  9. 8 ounces mushrooms, quartered
  10. 1 small head of broccoli, chopped
  11. 4 stalks of kale, chopped
  12. 1 tablespoon chili paste (2 tablespoons if you want an extra kick)
  13. 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  14. 6 cups vegetable broth
Garnishes
  1. Thinly sliced radish
  2. Lime
  3. Cilantro
  4. Green onion
  5. Bean sprouts (not strict Paleo)
For the broth
  1. In a pan over medium heat, toast the cloves, star anise, and cinnamon until fragrant to open the flavors. This should take about 5 minutes. Remove the spices from the pan so they do not burn and set aside. (See note).
  2. In a large pot over medium heat, sauté the shallot, garlic, and ginger in the coconut oil for 3-5 minutes. Stir constantly so the garlic does not burn.
  3. Add vegetable broth and spices and bring to a boil. Cover the pot, reduce the heat, and simmer for 2 hours.
For the soup
  1. Fish the whole spices out of the broth. Add the beef and bring the soup to a boil.
  2. Reduce the heat and add the mushrooms, broccoli, and kale. Simmer for an additional 20 minutes.
  3. Add the chili paste. Stir, taste and adjust the seasoning. If the soup is tasting a bit flat, add a teaspoon of sea salt to bring out the flavors.
  4. Serve with any or all of the garnishes above!
Notes
  1. I use ground cardamom in this recipe because I did not have whole cardamom. Ground spices burn quickly; therefore, I do not toast the cardamom. I just add it right to the broth in step 3.
Cucina Kristina http://cucinakristina.com/

How To Shop For And Trim Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts. People love ‘em or hate ‘em. I, myself, am a sprout lover. I eat brussels sprouts two to three times a week. Sometimes I have them alongside eggs for breakfast and other times I have them as a side dish with dinner.

If you are a sprout hater, I beg you to try one of the recipes at the bottom of this post and surely you’ll change your mind! One of my favorite ways to enjoy them is browned in ghee and bacon fat, seasoned with salt and pepper, and tossed with dried cranberries and toasted almonds. Simple, colorful, and delicious.

How to Shop for Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are usually sold individually; however, during the fall when they are in season, sometimes they are sold on the stalk. How cool do they look on the stalk? I have unsuccessfully tried to grow brussels sprouts in my garden for the past two years. Perhaps this is the year! :-)

If your local grocery store or farmer’s market is selling the sprouts on the stalk, do not be intimidated! They are easy to remove and you do not need any fancy or special equipment to do so. 

Brussels sprouts grow on a stalk

To choose a “good” sprouts, pick them up and give them a little squeeze. The leaves should feel tightly packed especially around the base. You will be trimming off the bottom and if the leaves are loose around the stem, you’ll lose some of the good leaves along with the dirty ones.

Trimming brussels sprouts

How to Trim Brussels Sprouts

If you buy brussels sprouts on the stalk, you can snap them off by hand before you begin to trim them. I never wash brussels sprouts before I cook them. Is that gross? I don’t feel much of a need to wash them first because you end up removing all of the dirty outer leaves as you prep them for cooking. After you have removed the outer leaves, if you’d like to wash them, you can give them a quick rinse under cold water.

Trimming brussels sprouts

Trim a small portion off the bottom of the sprout. Some of the leaves may fall off on their own, that is ok. 

Trimming brussels sprouts

Pull the outer leaves off until you see lighter green, shiny leaves. You’ll also want to remove any yellow, bruised, or dirty leaves. 

Trimming brussels sprouts

Now, you are ready to cook them. You can roast them, grill them, sauté them, steam them, or pickle them. They are such a versatile veggie and so tasty when prepared correctly! In the picture below, I halved them, because I was about to toss them in olive oil, season them with this spice blend and roast them for 25 minutes at 375˚. 

Trimming brussels sprouts

Ready to tackle the sprout on your own? Check out these awesome brussels sprouts recipes:

Red Thai Curry Mussels

Are you familiar with Lewis Carroll’s The Walrus and the Carpenter? It’s the poem recited by Tweedledee and Tweedledum in Alice in Wonderland and tells the story of walrus and a carpenter who happen upon a bed of oysters while walking along the beach. They invite the oysters to walk with them and, when they stop to rest, the walrus devours all of the oysters before the carpenter has a chance to eat any.

That’s basically what happens whenever anyone orders mussels with me in a restaurant. I love mussels. I don’t mean to be greedy! I intend to share every time, but they are so tasty that I find myself easily getting carried away. I am totally the walrus!

Empty Mussels | Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

They’d been eaten. Every one.

The first time I had mussels was in college. I went to UC Berkeley and one of my favorite things to do on weekends was hop on BART and head to Fisherman’s Warf in San Francisco. There, I’d grab a bowl of clam chowder and make my way to Aquatic Park (the park behind Ghriardelli Square) and study. One day, I grabbed cioppino instead of clam chowder and my love for mussels was born! 

Side note: I’ve yet to make cioppino at home, but I am dying to try Tyler Florence’s version

Aquatic Park San Francisco

Clam chowder by the Bay!

For this recipe, I steam the mussels using light coconut milk that has been infused with garlic, ginger, and red curry paste. I use light coconut milk in this recipe because it has a milder taste than full fat coconut milk. I like that there is a hint of coconut in the broth that doesn’t overpower the taste of the mussels. 

Storing Mussels

Mussels are alive when you buy them and should be eaten the same day you purchase them. When you bring them home, store them in a bowl, on top of ice, in your refrigerator. You could also store them in a large pot of cold salt water in your fridge as this article suggests. 

Preparing Mussels

When you are ready to cook your mussels, you will first need to go through them and pick out any mussels with open, cracked, or punctured shells. Discard any with cracked or punctured shells. Tap open mussels on the counter. If they close, they are still alive and ok to eat. If they do not close, they are dead and should be thrown away. 

Next, you will need to debeard the mussels. The “beard” looks like little threads of seaweed sticking out from the side of the mussel. To remove this, grab it and pull towards the hinge end of the mussel. Most come out fairly easily, but there are some you will have to wrestle with. 

Mussel parts. The beard of a mussel. The hinge of a mussel. | Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

The hinge is the side holding the mussel together. Pull the beard towards the hinge.

After you remove the beard, rinse the mussel under cold running water and scrub any dirt off the outside of the shell. Finally, soak them in a bowl of ice water for about 5 minutes to flush out any remaining dirt or grit that may be inside the shell. 

Red Thai Curry Mussels
Serves 2
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
30 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  2. 2 green onions, chopped -or- 1 small shallot, minced
  3. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 1-inch piece of fresh ginger, minced
  5. 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste
  6. 1 can light coconut milk
  7. 1/3 can water, I use the coconut milk can
  8. 2 lbs. mussels
Optional Garnish
  1. 2 green onions, chopped
  2. Handful of cilantro, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a heavy bottom pot over medium-low heat, sweat the onions, garlic, and ginger in olive oil until fragrant, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the curry paste and cook, stirring, until softened, about 1 minute.
  3. Add the coconut milk and water and raise the heat medium-high. Bring just to a boil, stirring to blend all of the ingredients.
  4. Add the mussels and cover the pot. Cook until the mussels open, about 5-7 minutes.
  5. Divide the mussels evenly among two bowls. Discard any mussels that fail to open. Spoon the remaining cooking liquid over the mussels.
  6. Garnish with chopped green onion and cilantro, if desired.
Cucina Kristina http://cucinakristina.com/

Butternut Squash Flour

I am on the hunt to expand my Paleo breakfast ideas past fried eggs. I love eggs, but sometimes you just gotta change things up. I am still experimenting with this idea, but I was pretty surprised by the way these turned out so I thought I would share the test recipe with you. While browsing Amazon the other day, I came across pumpkin powder. Pumpkin powder is dehydrated pumpkin that is ground into a fine powder and can be used in place of flour. I was rather intrigued and decided to experiment with making my own.

Unfortunately, my local grocery store was totally out of pumpkins, so I picked up a butternut squash instead. Close enough! I wanted to experiment with making tortillas. Traditional corn tortillas are made from corn, water, and lime. Flour tortillas are made from flour, salt, water, and lard. Therefore, it stands to reason that you could make tortillas from any flour, right?

The result was pretty awesome even though my tortilla recipe still needs a bit of work. I think I made this first batch too thick because they split apart when I picked them up and didn’t hold together like a traditional tortilla. However, they tasted great so I just ate my breakfast with a knife and fork, tostada-style. :-) I might try adding a binder (flax seed, perhaps?) to the next batch and see if that helps. I’ll keep you posted!

Paleo Breakfast Ideas

Butternut squash toastadas!

To Make Butternut Squash Flour

Peel, seed, and cube the squash and spread it onto a dehydrator. You want small, evenly sized cubes. The pieces took FOREVER to dehydrate. I had them in there for close to 24 hours. Next time, I am going to shred the squash and see if that helps speed up the process!

When they are fully dehydrated, add to a blender and grind into a powder. This also took a bit of time because I have a pretty cheap blender. I imagine a VitaMix could do the trick in a few seconds! I am going to move the VitaMix to the top of my Christmas Wish List. :-)

Butternut Squash Tortillas (Test Recipe)

In a bowl, combine 1/3 cup butternut squash flour and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Add warm water by the tablespoon and mix until you get a doughy consistency. For me, 3 tablespoons was too little, but 4 tablespoons was too much. I had to play with this and add a little bit more flour to form a dough. Like I said… I am still experimenting!

Divide dough into 2 balls. Place dough between 2 pieces of waxed paper and press with a tortilla press. If you do not have a tortilla press, you can roll these out by hand. Toast the tortillas in a skillet, about 4 minutes on each side.

Butternut Squash Toastadas
Assemble the toastadas by placing two tortillas on a plate. Top with your favorite toppings.

In the photo above: 2 butternut squash tortillas, shredded chicken, tomatillo salsa, pickled carrots, and pumpkin seeds.

Other Paleo topping ideas: Shredded pork, ground beef, eggs, lettuce, guacamole, pico de gallo, olives, cilantro, fresh lime, onions, peppers, and thinly sliced radish.

Have you ever used squash flour? 

Homemade Ghee -or- DIY Clarified Butter

So many recipes in the Paleosphere call for ghee. What’s ghee? Ghee is another name for clarified butter! What’s clarified butter? The stuff that you dip your fingers into at a seafood restaurant… or lobster tail if you are trying to exhibit table manners. Seriously, how tasty is clarified butter? So tasty!

Wait? Butter is Paleo? No. Butter is not Paleo-friendly because it comes from cream, which contains casein and lactose, but when you make ghee, you remove the milk proteins and are left with a delicious nutty fat that is perfect for roasting, sautéing, searing, stir-frying, or melting and drizzling over your favorite veggie.

ANYWAY… it turns out that ghee is incredibly easy (and quick!) to make. I made this really early in the morning because I am a freak and like to wake up before the sun. True story. Then, I used it to make steak and eggs and baked apples. I even thought about putting some of it in my coffee and making Paleo butter coffee, but I thought that might be going a little overboard for one morning. Maybe I will try that next week. :-)

Ingredients and Supplies:

  • 1 pound butter
  • Glass jar for storing the ghee – I used a pint Mason jar
  • Cheesecloth
  • Wooden spoon/Solid spoon to skim the foam
  • Pot

Directions:

1.  Over a low heat, melt the butter in your pot.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

Use a low heat so your butter does not burn.

2.  Try to avoid stirring your butter as it is melting because you want to milk solids to foam up and separate from the fats. When it starts to look like the picture below, use a wooden or solid spoon to skim the foam off the top.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

Not stirring is so hard

You might have to do this a few times to get all of the milk proteins out.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

Just keep skimming, just keep skimming…

3.  When it starts to look like the photo above, let it boil for 10-12 minutes. The milk solids may start to brown and float to the side. That’s ok! You want that. That is giving the ghee a deep nutty flavor.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

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4.  When it the bubbling slows and the browned milk solids start to fall to the bottom of the pan, your ghee is ready to be strained.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

Strain any browned bits out.

5.  If you are using a mason jar, place 3 layers of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and loosely screw on the lid. You want to make sure that the cheesecloth has a little give to it. Notice in the photo above the gap between the cloth and the rim of the lid. Strain any browned bits or foam out.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

This will be HOT. Do not grab it right away!

6.  Discard the cheesecloth. BE CAREFUL! The rim, jar, and ghee will be hot! Let it cool for a bit before you start to handle it.

Ghee - Cucina Kristina | cucinakristina.com

Ta da!

When it cools, it will solidify and turn a nice silky color. You can just scoop out however much you need and start cooking. Since the milk proteins have been removed, you do not need to refrigerate your ghee; however, I do to be on the safe side.

Now, stop reading and go make some ghee!

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